How I Stay Healthy

Workout hard, mix it up and eat your vegetables.

I workout at least five times a week and I do something different every day. When I am in the 'gym' routine, I do an intense weight lifting workout one day, then a killer kick box or power yoga class the next, Spinning the next day, yoga following and on my last day either a dance class or I lift again. I do at least 1500 abs a week. I have been a fitness instructor for almost 30 years but I got into my best shape ever following this routine. Plus I eat a lot less than I used to.

My best advice for people wanting to change their body with exercise: you MUST work hard to see changes. Most workouts leave me feeling like a rung out towel. But I see so many people in the gym doing the same workout day in day out and their body NEVER changes.

Powered by Plinky

Starting The Day Off Right

Yesterday I did something different in the morning when I got up – I lit a fire in our fire pit on our patio.

Yes – I took bits of saved up newspaper, shoved them under a very un-eco friendly fake log and lit it up with a butane lighter.

It was amazing. I sat and read the early morning news, crafted a blog post & enjoyed the sun rise.

When my son and husband woke – they joined me outside. My son LOVED having an “outdoor” fireplace. He thought it was so cool.

So did I. So did my husband. The morning was great. We talked until it was time for breakfast. Then we ate al fresco & the morning was just blissful. No TV, no crying or windging about this or that. Just peace. Calm.

It carried through to my entire day. I was amazingly productive!

So I think I’ll do it again tomorrow – hopefully it will have the same calm & peaceful effect.

What’s your perfect way to start your day? Struggling in the mornings or do you have a pace & routine you love?

If so do share.

Peace & Love

~BjW

The Sky Is Not Falling

Chicken Little ran around scaring everyone with his cry about the sky falling and sometimes we do the same.
With access to media and viral emails we often extrapolate more fear than is necessary and the radiation fall out from Japan is one such topic.

In today’s New York Times, an article discusses the amounts of radio active material from the reactors in Japan versus the amounts after Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the effects on people.

“Dr. Douple emphasized that at very low doses, the risk was also very low. But he also said that there was no indication of a threshold, or a level below which acute radiation exposure would have no effect, or a smaller effect than would be predicted based on higher exposures,” according to the article, read more here.

The article goes on to point out that,

“Outof 120,000 survivors in one study group, 219 with radiation exposure had died of leukemia from 1950 through 2002, the latest year with published data. But only 98 of those cases, or 45 percent, were excess deaths attributed to radiation.”

Granted to the relatives of those patients and the patients themselves this is little consolation and as a cancer survivor I truly do understand. But as a scientist and journalist the point is, in the big picture it is not “the sky falling.”

So the next time a disaster strikes or fear sets in, take a few moments to read solid information. Seek out smart, educated, scholarly and well documented research before you let your imagination run away with you, your heart, lungs and all your cells will thank you for it.